Making the len function work on your Python objects

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Trey Hunner
2 minute read Python 3.7—3.10
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In Python, you can make the built-in len function work on your objects.

The len function only works on objects that have a length

The built-in len function works on some objects, but not on others. Only things that have a length work with the len function.

Lists, sets, dictionaries, strings, and most data structures in Python have a length:

>>> numbers = [2, 1, 3, 4, 7, 11, 18]
>>> len(numbers)
7

But numbers don't:

>>> n = 10
>>> len(n)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: object of type 'int' has no len()

When making a class in Python, you can control whether instances of that class have a length.

Python's built-in len function calls the __len__ method (pronounced "dunder len") on the object you give it.

So if that object has a __len__ method, it has a length:

>>> numbers = [2, 1, 3, 4, 7, 11, 18]
>>> numbers.__len__()
7

If it doesn't have a __len__ method, the len function raises a TypeError instead:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: object of type 'int' has no len()

How to make instances of your class have a length?

Python's random module has a function (choice) which can randomly select an item from a given sequence.

>>> import random
>>> colors = ['red', 'blue', 'green', 'purple']
>>> random.choice(colors)
'purple'

This choice function only works on objects that can be indexed and have a length.

Here we have a class named ForgivingIndexer:

class ForgivingIndexer:

    def __init__(self, sequence):
        self.sequence = sequence

    def __getitem__(self, index):
        return self.sequence[int(index)]

This class has a __init__ method and a __getitem__ method. That __getitem__ method allows instances of this class to be indexed using square brackets ([]).

But this isn't quite enough to allow our ForgivingIndexer objects to work with the random.choice function. If we pass a ForgivingIndexer object to the random.choice function, we'll get an error:

>>> import random
>>> fruits = ForgivingIndexer(['apple', 'lime', 'pear', 'watermelon'])
>>> random.choice(fruits)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/lib/python3.10/random.py", line 378, in choice
    return seq[self._randbelow(len(seq))]
TypeError: object of type 'ForgivingIndexer' has no len()

Python gives us an error because ForgivingIndexer objects don't have a length, which the random.choice function requires. These objects don't work with the built-in len function:

>>> fruits = ForgivingIndexer(['apple', 'lime', 'pear', 'watermelon'])
>>> len(fruits)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: object of type 'ForgivingIndexer' has no len()

In order to support the built-in len function, we can add a __len__ method to this class:

    def __len__(self):
        return len(self.sequence)

Now instances of this class have a length:

>>> import random
>>> fruits = ForgivingIndexer(['apple', 'lime', 'pear', 'watermelon'])
>>> len(fruits)
4

And they also work with random.choice:

>>> random.choice(fruits)
'apple'

Summary

You can make your objects work with the built-in len function by adding a __len__ method to them. You'll pretty much only ever add a __len__ method if you're making a custom data structure, like a sequence or a mapping.

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